If It Was Broken, We Fixed It
Circa 1969. I'm the little blonde one in front.

Circa 1969. I’m the little blonde one in front.

Growing up my dad had a nickname, “Andy the Handyman.” He fixed our toys, unclogged drains, and mended our purses. He even stretched our shoes when we needed him to!

I’ll never forget the red toolbox. It’s almost as though it was a part of him, the way mom’s purse was a part of her. Whether he was travelling to and from home, or just tinkering around the house, he carried it often. Pulling out one tool for this, and another for that he kept our home safe and secure.

If it was broken, we took it to dad and he fixed it. Mom’s pot had a wooden spool for a handle, the rolling pin had a new dowel put in, and way back in the day he hung up a cardboard door in their bedroom.

If something was torn, Mom would mend it–if a button popped off, she would fix it.

Money was scarce for a while, but one thing that never changed is that they valued the things that they owned.

Clothes were passed down from one girl to the next, and if they weren’t in style we got on our sewing machines where we made a few changes. Being the youngest, it’s no wonder I sewed as much as I did.

Watching the Carol Burnett show with light bulbs in hand, we darned socks.  Yes–with a light bulb, a needle and thread.

If it was broken, we fixed it. That was their motto.

It was comforting to see them at work, but more important than watching them care for our home, we witnessed the way that they cared for each other.

During those formative years we learned the importance of commitment and stewardship. We learned that a vow was a vow.

During good times and bad, they exercised patience, forgiveness, and grace. Sure there were days like anyone else when the going was tough, but giving up wasn’t an option. They worked together to work things out and weathered each storm that blew through.

Mom and Dad held onto the promise, “til death do us part.” And during that moment of silence when he took his last breath, they were still holding on to each other.

You are loved by an almighty God,

Darlene Schacht
timewarpwife.com

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Written by Darlene Schacht

I'm an Evangelical Christian whose number one priority is to serve Jesus Christ in every area of my life. My husband Michael and I live in Manitoba Canada. Married 25 years, we have four children (three still at home), a bird and two pugs who are everyone's babies, especially mine! Our lives are basically surrounded with three things: our faith, music and everything books. I’m an award winning and New York Times best-selling author who is nothing without the grace of God. Facebook: timewarpwife Twitter: timewarpwife Pinterest: timewarpwife

5 Comments

  1.  avatar
    Elissa P says:

    Beautiful. It was as if I was sitting in your parents living room. I too saw my parent ‘fixing’ everything and today, after 42 years they are still working and loving and fixing stuff together.

    I pray that God will bless my marriage like He did theirs and your parents.

    Peace to you.

  2.  avatar
    Andrea Hubin says:

    Thanks for this post! I continually appreciate your blog as you encourage us to love our husbands well and give us hope that marriage does NOT have to turn into just two roommates living together with no vibrant relationship and friendship. As a 27-year-old who has only been married 5 1/2 years so far, I often get fearful and discouraged by what I see and hear from older couples. I LOVE my relationship with my husband, I LOVE being a TEAM together, and I have high hopes of working hard through good times and bad to keep it this way till death do us part. But all around me, I hear the message that it is inevitable that we will drift apart, that the best is behind us, that there is no hope of a passionate relationship in year 30, 40 and 50 of marriage.
    So THANK YOU for speaking a different word. A Biblical word.

    On a superficial side, THANK YOU for the link to how to darn a sock!! No one has ever told me/showed me how to do this before, but it looks so easy! I hate spending money and my socks get holes all the time. I am so excited that I am going to go dig my favorite pair of socks out of the trash (just threw ‘em out the other day) and try to darn them!

    Because of His incredible grace,
    Andrea

    • It really IS easy. I was a little kid when we did them. It was a lot of fun too! When I was looking for a link I noticed that some people use darning eggs. It’s wooden, so I guess it would be safe than glass, but we used what we had. :) Thanks for your note!

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